Dementia Today.net

Site updated at Wednesday, 22 June 2016

Living with Dementia

Kraepelin

Dementia: historical overview

Since the second edition of this article, no ground-breaking scholarly work has been published that may challenge the historical hypotheses propounded therein on the development of the concept of dementia (Berrios, 2000a); indeed, the ‘constructionist’ view has gained support from the way in which the nosological surface of ‘dementia’ has been redrawn during the… Dementia: historical overview   



Presbyophrenia and confabulation

The word ‘presbyophrenia’ was coined by Kahlbaum (1863) to name a subtype of the paraphrenias (insanities occurring during periods of biological change). Presbyophrenia was a form of paraphrenia senilis characterized by amnesia, disorientation, delusional misidentification and confabulation.

Ignored for more than 30 years, the term reappeared in the work of Wernicke, Fischer and Kraepelin.… Presbyophrenia and confabulation   



Alzheimer’s disease

AD has become the prototypical form of dementia. From this point of view, a study of its origins should throw light on the evolution of the concept of dementia. The writings of Alzheimer, Fischer, Fuller, Lafora, Bonfiglio, Perusini, Ziveri, Kraepelin and other protagonists are deceptively fresh, and this makes anachronistic reading inevitable.  However,  the… Alzheimer’s disease   



Alzheimer’s Disease

late-onset alzheimer's2 - quality sleep1 - retinopathy1 - behavioral problems1 - disorientation3 - frontotemporal dementia symptoms1 - vecordia1 - bladder troubles1 - hormone therapy1 - chronic traumatic encephalopathy1 - genetic evidence1 - baroness thatcher1 - blood test1 - music therapy1 - cerebrovascular disease1 - dementia resistant1 - alzheimer's patient1 - mental impairment1 - physical reality1 - non-familial parkinson's1 - abstract thinking1 - lethal condition1 - menopause1 - cholesterol-lowering drugs1 - impaired balance and coordination1 - age-related cognitive disorders1 - repair damaged nerve tissue1 - causes of dementia1 - parkinson's treatment1 - entorhinal cortex1 -